Sophisticated Living Indianapolis

JAN-FEB 2019

Issue link: http://digital.slmag.net/i/1067921

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 105 of 135

Interior designers are artists, and as such we should expect them to exhibit artistic traits. Some designers, like some artists, are egotistical to the exclusion of all others; they are their work and their work is their inner expression, not necessarily their client's. Others, like Rosalind Brinn Pope, could be seen more as a conduit, a medium whose role is to explore her client's personality, needs and passions, and to translate them into a cohesive design that blends day-to-day functionality with character and individuality. Providing a complete design service for new builds and renovations, Pope, ASID (American Society of Interior Designers), has more than 20 years' experience creating timeless interiors for a discerning clientele. Perhaps best known for her warm and inviting designs featuring a French or English influence, Pope also wins over clients with her old-time Southern aesthetic. "at has become my niche," the designer explains. "I create classic designs with a fresh take. I believe a home should feel as if it developed naturally over time." Early in her career Pope moved to Indianapolis, where she opened Pope Interiors, subsequently relocating to the Indiana Design Center (IDC) in Carmel. A designer with a strong sense of history, and a sense for both individuals' and objects' connections with the past, she seeks out clients who are not necessarily interested in the cookie-cutter aesthetics that are so ubiquitous today on the internet. "It's fine to have some inspiration from Houzz.com," she offers. "ere's nothing wrong with taking inspiration. It can start you thinking, but don't let it stop you thinking." Possibly inspired by the more dedicated spaces of elegant Georgian homes, Pope believes that each room should have its own function. "If it doesn't function well," she says, "then it's pointless, regardless of how beautiful it might be." Highly responsive to her clients' needs, the designer has been known to revisit a home and completely change the color scheme if the homeowners have a change of heart. Open to the public as well as the trade, Pope is interested in working with her clients from the beginning of a project and, even though she probably will not say it herself, is interested in clients who have something unique to offer to the process, whether that is a certain aesthetic, or a collection of art. "I have such a variety of clients, each of whom has a totally different perspective on objects and their relationship with the past. ere is no right or wrong. I enjoy it when the clients have art that they have collected. I need a starting point, and a client's art and collectibles can give me that." Wrapping up, the designer shares some advice that we could probably all use. "Enjoy your things," she says. "Sometimes people have pretty china or collectibles, but if we don't enjoy them, there's no point in having them. And when you're at the grocery store, pick up some flowers." sl For more information, visit popeinteriors.com. Written by Neil Charles / Photography by Shane Rodimel A DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVE Pope Interiors places emphasis on personality. 104 slmag.net

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Sophisticated Living Indianapolis - JAN-FEB 2019